Restoration of Degraded Ecosystem

Restoration of Degraded Ecosystem

World's biodiversity lost faster than it recovers

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[MEDELLÍN] The planet's biodiversity is being lost faster than it recovers, with developing regions expected to bear the brunt of future soil degradation, warns a global assessment report produced by hundreds of scientists, government officials and civil society. Forty per cent of the biodiversity in the Americas will be lost by 2050, according to figures released during the Sixth Plenary session of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES), which brought together some 550 researchers and officials from 129 countries this month (March 17-24) in Medellin, Colombia. Four regional assessment reports were approved at the meeting, covering biodiversity and ecosystem services in Africa, the Americas, Asia and the Pacific, Central Asia and Europe. Continue reading..

Restoration of Degraded Ecosystem

Study counts lives saved with push for 1.5°C climate target

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Speeding up progress on reducing carbon emissions would save millions of lives, mostly in metropolitan areas of Africa and Asia. To keep global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius, the world would need to cut the majority of fossil-fuel related carbon emissions this century – and because this would also reduce air pollution locally, it would prevent 150 million premature deaths, according to a paper published in Nature Climate Change. Continue reading..

Restoration of Degraded Ecosystem

Forty per cent of global e-waste comes from Asia

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[NEW DELHI] Humans generated a staggering 44.7 million metric tonnes of electronic waste (e-waste) in 2016 — the equivalent of 4,500 Eiffel Towers, and five per cent more than the electrical and electronic goods discarded just two years earlier, says a new study. The trend is set to continue, with volumes of e-waste expected to rise to 52. Continue reading..

Restoration of Degraded Ecosystem

Disasters causing billions in agricultural losses, with drought leading the way

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15 March 2018, Rome/Hanoi - Natural disasters are costing farmers in the developing world billions of dollars each year, with drought emerging as the most destructive in a crowded field of threats that also includes floods, forest fires, storms, plant pests, animal diseases outbreaks, chemical spills and toxic algal blooms. According to a new report  from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), between 2005 and 2015 natural disasters cost the agricultural sectors of developing country economies a staggering $96 billion in damaged or lost crop and livestock production. Half of that damage — $48 billion worth — occurred in Asia, says the report, which was launched today at a conference in Hanoi convened by Viet Nam's government in collaboration with FAO. Continue reading..

Restoration of Degraded Ecosystem

Plastic debris linked to coral disease, death

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[NEW YORK] An international group of researchers has found that plastic trash entering the world’s oceans attracts microbes that cause corals to sicken and die.  “Plastic debris acts like a marine motorhome for microbes,” says Joleah Lamb, research fellow at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York and lead author of the study published last month (26 January) in Science. Plastics can cause physical injury to coral tissues, facilitating invasion of pathogens associated with disease outbreaks, the study says. Continue reading..

Restoration of Degraded Ecosystem

These Lab-Grown Corals Could Save The Planet

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Decades into his career, marine biologist David Vaughan stumbled upon a method for growing coral faster than had previously been believed possible, a breakthrough that can add clean air to the planet, and has possible implications for treatment of cancer and tumors. Now he has a new lease on life and is determined not to retire until he can plant a million new corals. Watch the video below to learn more about his method. Continue reading..